Volker Neubeck Clemens Pasda

Caribou Hunting in Alpine West Greenland. An Archaeological Investigation

Published: 2015-01-01 | DOI: 10.54799/EGIG5418

Abstract

In 2014–2015 surveys have been made in the mountain range north of Kangerluarsunnguup Tasersua, a large inland lake south of Nuuk (West Greenland). As evidence of Paleo-Inuit and Norse is scarce, no detailed information can be given on caribou hunting during these time periods. In contrast, 88 sites connected with caribou hunting in Late Thule (c. AD 1600-1700) and the Colonial time period (c. AD 1700-1950) have been registered. These sites indicate three distinct alpine hunting grounds. Every hunting ground was used by small, mobile groups of hunting companions, only one also by small, related households who stayed at one spot for a longer time period. Households and hunters preferred to sleep at medium height to hunt caribou here as well as in the highest areas. Caribou hunting with the help of drive lanes was done rarely. In contrast, the main hunting method was using single or few stone-built shooting coverts which are situated in small, natural bottlenecks.

How to Cite

Neubeck, Volker, and Clemens Pasda. 2015. “Caribou Hunting in Alpine West Greenland. An Archaeological Investigation”. EAZ – Ethnographisch-Archaeologische Zeitschrift 56 (1/2):65-91. https://doi.org/10.54799/EGIG5418.
Hunters' beds (measure rule is 1 m long) (Photo: Volker Neubeck & Clemens Pasda)
Hunters' beds (measure rule is 1 m long) (Photo: Volker Neubeck & Clemens Pasda)
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